Advances in Influenza Research

About Advances in Influenza Research

‘Advances in Influenza Research’ is a Journal that publishes articles based on original research on basic and clinical sciences related to Influenza. The Journal also features review articles, critiques, controversies, methods, technical notes, selected case studies s and articles of special nature. The journal offers peer-reviewed articles on stroke, supported by clinical and basic investigation on Influenza virus and associated diseases to clinicians and researchers to facilitate enhanced patient management and education. The journal also supports articles written based on clinical or experimental research to add value and professionalism. Its editorial mission is to focus on prevention and rectification of Influenza diseases. Influenza Research mainly involves molecular virology, pathogenesis, host immune responses, genomics, and epidemiology regarding influenza. The main aim of influenza research is to focus on advances and developments in vaccines, therapies and diagnostic tools. The Journal particularly welcomes contributions from the specialists in the field of microbiology, immunology, cell biology etc.

Virology

Virology is the study of viruses and virus-like agents: their structure, classification and evolution, their ways to infect and exploit cells for virus reproduction, the diseases they cause, the techniques to isolate and culture them, and their use in research and therapy.

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Journal of Virology. Virology, Journal of General Virology, Archives of Virology, Microbes and Infection, Journal of Microbiological Methods, Canadian Journal of Microbiology, Journal of Medical Virology, Journal of Virological Methods, Critical Reviews in Microbiology, Journal of Autoimmunity and Advances in Virus Research

Influenza

Influenza is a viral infection that attacks respiratory system - nose, throat and lungs. Influenza, commonly called the flu, is not the same as stomach "flu" viruses that cause diarrhea and vomiting.

Related Journals of  Influenza

Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses, Virus Research, Advances in Virus Research, Viruses, Virus Adaptation and Treatment

Influenza Virus

There are two main types of influenza (flu) virus: Types A and B. The influenza A and B viruses that routinely spread in people (human influenza viruses) are responsible for seasonal flu epidemics each year. Influenza A viruses can be broken down into sub-types depending on the genes that make up the surface proteins. Over the course of a flu season, different types (A & B) and subtypes (influenza A) of influenza circulate and cause illness.

Related Journals of  Influenza Virus

Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, Virology Journal, Influenza Gateway

Influenza Treatment & Therapies

While not 100% effective, a flu vaccine is the first and best way to prevent influenza. Antiviral drugs are a second line of defense to treat the flu if you get sick. When used for treatment, antiviral drugs can lessen symptoms and shorten the time you are sick by 1 or 2 days.

Related Journals of  Influenza Treatment & Therapies

Influenza Research and Treatment, Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, Virus Adaptation and Treatment, Virus Research, Advances in Virus Research

Influenza Vaccination

The influenza vaccine, also known as flu shot, is an annual vaccination using a vaccine that is specific for a given year to protect against the highly variable influenza virus.

Related Journals of  Influenza Vaccination

Clinical and Vaccine Immunology : CVI, Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, Genetic Vaccines and Therapy, Human Vaccines, Vaccines, Clinical and Experimental Vaccine Research, Journal of Immune Based Therapies and Vaccines, Therapeutic Advances in Vaccines

Flu

Flu is a respiratory infection caused by a number of viruses. The viruses pass through the air and enter your body through your nose or mouth. Between 5% and 20% of people in the U.S. get the flu each year. The flu can be serious or even deadly for elderly people, newborn babies, and people with certain chronic illnesses.

Related Journals of  Flu

Influenza Gateway, Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses, Virus Research, Advances in Virus Research, Viruses, Virus Adaptation and Treatment

Flu Treatment & Care

Treatment for influenza (the flu) centers on relieving major symptoms until they go away. Antibiotics are useless in fighting the problem since the flu is caused by a virus. However, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics to treat any secondary bacterial infections that may be present. In addition, some combination of self-care and medication to treat your symptoms will be recommended.

Related Journals of  Flu Treatment & Care

Influenza Research and Treatment, Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, Virus Adaptation and Treatment, Virus Research, Advances in Virus Research

Antiviral agents & Drugs

Antiviral agents are used to inhibit production of viruses that cause disease. Most antiviral agents are only effective while the virus is replicating. It is difficult to find medicines that are selective for the virus as viruses share most of the metabolic processes of the host cell. However, some enzymes are only present in viruses and these are potential targets for antiviral drugs.

Related Journals of  Antiviral agents & Drugs 

Antiviral Research, PLOS Pathogens, International Journal of Peptide Research and Therapeutics, Hepatology Research, Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Archives of Virology, PLOS One and International Immunology, Antiviral Research, PLOS One, Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Current Drug Targets, Virus Research, International Journal of Immunopharmacology, Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety and Biomedical Chromatography

Influenza Disease Management

Prevention is the most effective management strategy for influenza. To prevent seasonal flu, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends routine annual influenza vaccination for all persons aged 6 months or older, preferably before the onset of influenza activity in the community.

Related Journals of  Influenza Disease Management

Clinical Infectious Diseases, Journal of Infectious Diseases, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Lancet Infectious Diseases, Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases

Virus Structure

The protein layer that surrounds and protects the nucleic acids is called the capsid. When a single virus is in its complete form and has reached full infectivity outside of the cell, it is known as a virion. A virus structure can be one of the following: icosahedral, enveloped, complex or helical.

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Journal of Virology. Virology, Journal of General Virology, Archives of Virology, Microbes and Infection, Journal of Microbiological Methods, Canadian Journal of Microbiology, Journal of Medical Virology, Journal of Virological Methods, Critical Reviews in Microbiology, Journal of Autoimmunity and Advances in Virus Research

Viral Cell Biology

Viruses are not plants, animals, or bacteria, but they are the quintessential parasites of the living kingdoms. Although they may seem like living organisms because of their prodigious reproductive abilities, viruses are not living organisms in the strict sense of the word.

Related Journals of  Viral Cell Biology

Journal of Virology. Virology, Journal of General Virology, Archives of Virology, Microbes and Infection, Journal of Microbiological Methods, Canadian Journal of Microbiology, Journal of Medical Virology, Journal of Virological Methods, Critical Reviews in Microbiology, Journal of Autoimmunity and Advances in Virus Research

Influenza Epidemiology

Influenza is a highly infectious viral disease which can occur as a pandemic, epidemic, outbreak and in form of sporadic cases. A majority of human infections are caused by either type A or B influenza viruses. Type A has been associated with widespread epidemics and pandemics, while type B has been infrequently implicated in regional epidemics. Influenza type C infections cause only a mild respiratory illness.

Related Journals of  Influenza Epidemiology

Clinical Infectious Diseases, Journal of Infectious Diseases, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Lancet Infectious Diseases, Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases

Pathogenesis of influenza

Influenza virus is introduced into the airways by aerosol or by contact with saliva or other respiratory secretions from an infected individual, it binds to and replicates in epithelial cells.of both the upper and lower respiratory tract. Viral replication combined with the immune response to infection lead to destruction and loss of the epithelial cells the respiratory mucosa. Cough and weakness may persist for up to 2 weeks after infection. Influenza enters the host through the airways.

Related Journals of  Pathogenesis of influenza

BMC Infectious Diseases, Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, Infectious Disease Clinics of North America

Influenza Etiology

Influenza results from infection by any of three types of flu viruses: types A, B and C. Type A infections are most common and cause the most serious disease. Type B influenza is usually associated with a mild form of the disease and is more common in the pediatric population. Type C is rarely seen.

Related Journals of  Influenza Etiology

Clinical Infectious Diseases, Journal of Infectious Diseases, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Lancet Infectious Diseases, Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases

Influenza Respiratory Infections

Influenza (flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness. Serious outcomes of flu infection can result in hospitalization or death. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications.

Related Journals of  Influenza Respiratory Infections

Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses, Respiratory Research, Canadian Respiratory Journal, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

Flu Transmission

People with flu can spread it to others up to about 6 feet away. Most experts think that flu viruses are spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Less often, a person might also get flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth or nose.

Related Journals of  Flu Transmission

Clinical Infectious Diseases, Journal of Infectious Diseases, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Lancet Infectious Diseases, Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases

Flu Symptoms

Influenza (also known as the flu) is a contagious respiratory illness caused by flu viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The flu is different from a cold. The flu usually comes on suddenly. People who have the flu often feel some or all of these symptoms: Fever or feeling feverish/chills Cough Sore throat Runny or stuffy nose Muscle or body aches Headaches Fatigue (tiredness) Some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

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Virology Journal, Influenza Gateway, Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses, Virus Research, Advances in Virus Research, Viruses, Virus Adaptation and Treatment

Influenza Virus Infections

Initially, the flu may seem like a common cold with a runny nose, sneezing and sore throat. But colds usually develop slowly, whereas the flu tends to come on suddenly. And although a cold can be a nuisance, you usually feel much worse with the flu.

Related Journals of  Influenza Virus Infections

Infection and Immunity, Microbes and Infection, Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, Clinical Microbiology and Infection, Epidemiology and Infection, American Journal of Infection Control

Influenza Virus Morphology

Influenza viruses are roughly spherical, although somewhat pleomorphic, particles, ranging from 80 to 120 nm in diameter presents a model of the overall structure of the influenza virus. A characteristic feature of influenza virus particles is their external layer of approximately 500 spike-like projections. These spikes represent the envelope glycoproteins HA (which has a rod-like shape) and NA (which is mushroom-shaped). The HA spike is a trimer, consisting of three individual HA monomers, while the NA spike is a tetramer.

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Influenza Gateway, Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses, Virus Research, Advances in Virus Research, Viruses, Virus Adaptation and Treatment